Bicycling Accidents

Bicycling is a fabulous recreational activity and is increasingly becoming a ‘green’ mode of transportation throughout busy cities. However, like motorists, cyclists are...

Can I Sue the Road?

Cyclists are occasionally injured on the roads due to no fault of their own. The Province of Ontario enacted law to ensure that drivers of motor vehicles drive no closer than one meter from cyclists. This may prevent...

Contingency Fees

Hourly rate bills are often expected to be paid when rendered…and this might be before the completion of your legal action and before you have the money to pay. Therefore, in Ontario the Law Society of Upper Canada permits...

Dog Bites and Your Rights

If you have been bitten by a dog, the owner of that dog is automatically responsible for your injuries. The Dog Owner’s Liability Act in Ontario stipulates that the owner of a dog is...

Do I Need A Lawyer?

Accident victims do not want to add to their financial woes by adding lawyers fees unnecessarily. This article is a summary of the thought process I suggest an accident victim go through in order to answer that question for themselves...

Electrocuted? Electrical Injuries

Have you been electrocuted? Electrical burns and high voltage ‘zaps’ from being electrocuted can result in serious, and sometimes catastrophic, personal injuries. You may be entitled to compensation for your injuries.

Legal Recourse for Families

Spouses and children suffer following the injury or death of a loved one. When a person is injured due to the negligence of another, families of the injured person may have legal recourse...

Slip and Fall Accidents

Anyone who has ever suffered an injury from a slip and fall accident knows it’s not the fun depicted in cartoons with the rib-tickling slip on the banana peel...

Statute of Limitations

The Statute of Limitations determines the date by which you must sue for an incident or you lose your right to sue for that incident. This date is referred to as the limitation date. Do not confuse this with...

Steps in a Legal Action in Ontario

Many people are shocked to learn that Ontario civil court actions may take anywhere from eighteen months to five years or more before completion. Why so long?